Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Module Five – Chapter TEN – STITCH TO TRANSLATE


For Chapter TEN some rubbings from the previous Chapter are to be translated into stitch, using mainly only one stitch for each sample but in different forms, shapes and sizes. For all samples my background is the same black wool fabric, a remnant from a skirt I made a long time ago, and white or off-white threads as in all this Module.
I find that for most rubbings other stitches could have been used for translating marks and for me it was rather difficult to decide which one was best for the task at hand! 
    Buttonhole 1
Buttonhole 2
  • This is my first rubbing of choice, taken from the paper relief on the right. I see in it three main vertical lines around which I planned my stitching.
  • I used only buttonhole stitch on this sample, going vertically and then crossways. Two whitish threads are used, a basic No. 50 machine thread and a mohair yarn. The shaded areas are made from very loose fleece held down by stitch. I added silvery bugle beads in some focus areas.








ButtonholeButtonhole detail

Cretan 1 Cretan 2
The rubbing on the left was taken from the tracing paper sample on the right moving it to different angles.
The fabric was first rubbed with a white crayon on the same paper sample to get a ghost image.
I used Cretan stitch both in rows and isolated. In some areas I stitched on the back side so as to get single “dashes” on the front mainly for couching fibres and tulle net bits.

  Cretan stitch
Cretan stitch detail


Cross 1The paper sample below was rather flat but had interesting triangular shapes which left  distinctive marks when rubbed and I thought that these hard shapes could be hinted at by asymmetric cross stitches.
 Cross 2






The background fabric was first stamped with a triangular sponge using a white gouache and the resulting patches were partially covered in stitch and underlined by huge wrapped cross stitches.


Cross stitch


Darning 1
This rubbing was rather a surprise! The white crayon was dragged on the side leaving muted smudges.
For this sample I chose a very simple darning stitch. The foundation is machine darning with the addition of hand darning, very loose in some areas, and heavily distressed lace bits.Darning 2










Darning stitch

Darning stitch detail

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Module Five – Chapter NINE – RUBBINGS FROM RELIEF SURFACES



After many trials and failures I ended up with 18 rubbings from my relief surfaces. The most successful attempts were rubbings with oil pastels on black silk paper and I am going to choose some from this group to translate into stitchery in the next Chapter.


Rubbings1
Rubbings2

Rubbings3
Rubbings4

Module Five – Chapter NINE – THREADS AND STITCHERY


EXERCISE ONE – LEARNING STITCHES

In a first sampler I briefly taught myself some stitches and being well aware that mastering them is totally a different story I promised myself to keep trying … As suggested in the Module workbook I grouped them in FIVE categories.
For most stitches I used a fine and when needed a medium pearl cotton.
 






 LEARNING SAMPLER
Sampler ONE bis

Sampler TWO bis
Area 1 – FLAT STITCHES

1, 6 Running stitch – 2 Back stitch – 3 Fern stitch - 4 Chevron stitch - 5 Herringbone stitch - 7 Cross stitch – 8 Thorn stitch - 9 Dot stitch – 10 Darning stitch – 11 Arrowhead stitch – 12 St. George cross stitch – 13, 17 Seed stitch - 14 Satin stitch – 15 Stem stitch–16 Ermine filling stitch
Area 2 – LOOPED STITCHES
1, 7 – Buttonhole stitch – 2 Single Feather stitch – 3 Fly stitch – 4 Feather stitch – 5 Open Cretan stitch – 6 Cretan stitch – 8 Sword-edging stitch – 9 Plaited Fly stitch
Area 3 – CHAINED STITCHES
1 Chain stitch – 2 Open Chain stitch – 3 Twisted Chain stitch – 4 Cable stitch – 5 Detached Chain stitch – 6 Wheat Ear stitch – 7 Split stitch 8- Braid stitch
Area 4 – KNOTTED STITCHES
1 French knot – 2 Bullion knot – 3 Coral stitch – 4 Hollie stitch – 5 Knot stitch – 6 Diamond stitch – 7 Palestrine stitch – 8 Antwerp Edging stitch
Area 5 – COMPOSITE STITCHES
1, 2 Raised Chain Band - 3 Raised Stem Stitch Band - 4 Threaded Herringbone stitch – 5 Twisted Lattice Band – 6 Raised Chevron stitch – 7 Threaded Back stitch – 8 Threaded Buttonhole stitch -– 9 Whipped Chain stitch – 10 Back Stitched chain - 11 Pekinese stitch
And these are the threads and yarns used in this and the next two samplers:
Threads 

EXERCISE TWO – FORMAL AND INFORMAL STITCHING ARRANGEMENTS

The second exercise in Chapter 9 asks to choose a stitch and try to make it form different effects with it, following formal and informal stitch arrangements.
After some consideration my choice fell on BUTTONHOLE STITCH which I feel is very versatile. I also particularly enjoy forming it and following its rhythm.
Like the learning sampler, both the formal and informal samplers measure approximately 23 x 35 cms. They show each six rows of four sampling areas for a total of 24 sampling areas.  Each area in one sampler is more or less related to the same area in the other sampler, even if there are exceptions like the last two informal areas in the bottom row of the second sampler.
In the formal sampler I used almost everywhere the same pearl cotton thread from the learning sampler which shows the stitches well. In the informal one I introduced other threads in order to obtain a greater range of effects, a raffia yarn and tulle and fabric strips with the occasional addition of sequins and bits of fabrics.

FORMAL STITCHING ARRANGEMENT
Sampler THREE

INFORMAL STITCHING ARRANGEMENT
Sampler FOUR

Module Five – Chapter Eight – PAPER RELIEF INTO FABRIC RELIEF – PART TWO


This is the continuation of the latter post and presents four more samples of fabric translation from paper. Again, for an easy reference,  I have placed both the photographic record from Chapter 1 (on the left) and its related paper relief surface from Chapter 3 (on the right) before the picture of each fabric sample.

Fabric sample 7 – First translation into fabric
 

metallo13-uno Sample FOUR

For this first translation I rolled some felt tubes and saw them onto a linen background, then added on them cheesecloth, wadding and threads in imitation of rust together with a crocheted chain that relates to the real chain visible in the photo above. Techniques: appliqué.

 Sample SEVEN

 Detail
Sample SEVEN detail


Fabric sample 8 – Second translation into fabric

In this case tubes are made by padding big tucks and “rust” is obtained with heavy clusters of French knots and natural wood beads. Techniques: tucking, padded quilting, hand embroidery (French knots).

Sample EIGHT

 Detail
Sample EIGHT detail


Fabric sample 9 – First translation into fabric

metallo16-uno Sample FIVE


Techniques: padded quilting, wadded quilting, appliqué, hand embroidery (isolated fly stitches).
 

Sample NINE

 Detail
Sample NINE detail


Fabric sample 10 – Second translation into fabric

Techniques: appliqué, free machine embroidery.

Sample TEN

 Detail
Sample TEN detail